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Michael Pollan and Two Other New York Times Stories You Need to Read

Screen Shot 2013-05-28 at 10.25.08 PMThree stories in the New York Times you shouldn’t miss.

Sunday May 19 the newspaper’s environmental reporter Eileen Rosenthal looks at whether its time to ban plastic bags.  A great story that combines personal anecdotes everyone can relate to with details and terrific graphics about the huge and unfathomable mess bags are creating.  Of course in an era when Michelle Obama gets hammered for speaking about the benefits of eating healthy fresh foods this is an uphill battle but olets hope more places follow the lead of cities like Seattle and San Francisco.

Michael PollanAlso on May 19 Michael Pollan’s Sunday Magazine cover story looks at the powerful roles of germs and how they keep us healthy and vital.  As someone who abhors Purell  has been taking probiotic supplements for years and makes a variety of my own fermented foods and kombucha I wasn’t expecting to find this story so riveting but in classic Pollan form, it was an eye opener.

Jo Robinson’s opinion piece in The New York Times Sunday looks at what the author calls how we have and are “breeding the nutrition out of good food.”  She is the author of the soon to be published book  “Eating on the Wild Side: The Missing Link to Optimum Health.”  We don’t often find articles recommending how to choose more nutritious foods very interesting or useful.  This one is a very valuable exception to that rule.

 

 

 

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